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Depression and anxiety are often two sides of the same coin, and what we are told about both is not always accurate. Unfortunately, many of use struggle, feeling anxious or depressed, and in some way are told that there is something wrong with how our brain is working, and therefore we just need to fix with with a pill.

But what if depression is really an expression of grief, either over the fact that life is not the way it should be, or that we have lost connections that we still need. If this is the case, what if the solution is reconnecting to what matters. The medical route can certainly be helpful, and we do not want to downplay the role of medication in life of some, but so many on medication have not experienced the alleviation of their symptoms, and still feel like they are suffering. 

Additionally, understanding anxiety as the physiological experience of threat is a part of a necessary mental shift. Regardless of whether that threat is real or perceived, the body reacts the same way. Many of us attempt to deal with anxiety by attempting to convince ourselves that what we are worried about or feel threatened by should not be threatening. Simply put, that would be like trying to convince yourself that everything is fine while a bear is chasing you. Our brain simply does not work that way. 

Take a look at this video if you have a moment to learn more about what we are talking about

To deal with your anxiety, you have to both understand it and learn how to interact with it. Anxiety is not just an emotion, it is the body's response to threat. In order to deal with that response, you've got to address the threat rightly. 

Often we begin to feel threatened even by our own emotions when we become depressed and disconnected from what matters, and the experience of both anxiety and depression start to feel like the norm in our life.

 

IT DOES NOT HAVE TO BE THIS WAY.

Here are areas of disconnection we work towards helping clients reconnect to in order to regain a sense of purpose, hope, and direction: 

  1. Meaningful & Purposeful Work

  2. Other People & Real Relationship

  3. Meaningful Values

  4. Childhood or Experienced Trauma

  5. Our Place in The World in Relation to Others (Status & Respect)

  6. The Natural World (Nature & Our Own Body)

  7. A Secure and Hopeful Future

To learn more, take a look at Lost Connections written by Johann Hari.

Additionally, take a look below at what others have said who decided to enter into this work and take the step towards reconnecting to what matters. 

 
  • North Family Counseling Facebook